User:Elliealiese/Sandbox

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Historical Background[edit | edit source]

At the time your Jewish ancestors lived in what is now Moldova, it was known as Bessarabia.

Jewish History in Moldova[edit | edit source]


Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

JewishGen Gazetteer[edit | edit source]


Maps[edit | edit source]

  • To view present-day Moldova at Google Maps, click here.
  • For a Jewish population density map of Europe in 1900, click here.
  • For a map showing the percentage of Jews in the Pale of Settlement and Congress Poland, c. 1905, click here.
  • To view an additional historical map showing the historical percentage of Jews in governments, click here.

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

JewishGen Family Finder[edit | edit source]

  • The Family Finder is a database of both ancestral hometowns and surnames that have been researched by their descendants world wide. The Family Finder allows you to connect with others who are researching similar ancestors and origins and collaborate your research. To add the surnames and locations you are researching, click on Modify (Edit your existing entries) or Enter (Add new entries). Type in the surnames and/or locations of interest and hit Submit. To search the database and see if you can connect to family members and other researchers, choose Search (Search the database) from the Town Finder home page. You can search for a surname and/or a town. Search results will appear in a chart format giving you the surname, town, country, and researcher information (often includes contact information) and the date they last logged into JewishGen.

1897 Census?[edit | edit source]

The 1897 Russian Imperial Census was the first and only census carried out in the Russian Empire. The census enumerated the entire population of the Empire (excluding Finland), but after statistical data was gathered, many of the census returns were destroyed. There are, however; surviving census returns for many locations throughout Ukraine. Use the resources below to help you determine if census records survive for your ancestor's shtetl and how to access them. Use the Reading the 1897 Census "How to" Guide to learn how to read census records.  

JewishGen (indexed records)[edit | edit source]

1897 Census Finding Aids[edit | edit source]

Census returns may also exist for other locations, but images or indexes may not be available online. Use sites such as Archive Fonds of the First 1897 All-Russia Census or the Catalog of Surviving Census Sheets in Archives of Russia, Ukraine, and Other Countries to help you determine if census records exist for your area. These sites are in Russian, but can be easily navigated using Google Translate. If you are using the Google Chrome browser, just right click anywhere on the page and click Translate to English. If you are using a different browser (Safari, Firefox, Edge, etc.) you can still use Google Translate, but it requires a few extra steps. Go to translate.google.com and change the language settings to translate from Russian to English. Paste the URL of the site you would like translated into the Russian box and then click on the link that shows up in the English box. This will take you a translated version of the site.

Revision and Family Lists[edit | edit source]

Revision lists are enumerations of the taxable population (most Jews in the Russian empire fell into a taxable social class). There were ten revisions taken sporadically from 1772-1858. These records are a foundational source in genealogical research as they provide names, ages, and relationships.

Supplemental Lists, also known as Family Lists, can be found ranging from about 1860 through the end of the nineteenth century. They are similar in format to revision lists and are often grouped with revision list records in an archive.

JewishGen (indexed records)[edit | edit source]

Many revision list records have been indexed and are available through the JewishGen Romania-Moldova Database.

Revision List Finding Aids[edit | edit source]

If you are unable to locate records online, there are several resources to help you determine what records are available for your town and which archive they are currently stored in. Revision list records are referred to as "census" records, and may be translated as "Revision tales" or "Fairy tales." See the Additional Resources- Finding Aids and Records Inventories heading in this Wiki article for more information.  

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Throughout the Russian Empire, birth, marriage, divorce, and death records were required to be kept by the Jewish community beginning in 1835. Jewish records were generally kept in a tabular format with the left-side of the page in Russian and the right-side of the page in Hebrew. Vital records are available online in both indexed and digital image formats.

JewishGen (indexed records)[edit | edit source]


Vital Records Finding Aids[edit | edit source]

If you are unable to locate records online, there are several great resources to help you determine what records are available for your town and which archive they are currently stored in. See the Additional Records - Finding Aids and Records Inventories heading in this Wiki article for more information.  

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

  • JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry contains 230,000 burial records for Romania and Moldova.
  • Bessarabia SIG Cemeteries Projects has a list of 79 cemeteries where Jews were buried in Bessarabia/Moldova. Many tombstones have been transcribed, and with a donation you may be able to recieve a photograph of the grave. The SIG also manages restoration and cleaning projects for cemeteries.

Holocaust[edit | edit source]

Yizkor Books[edit | edit source]

Yizkor books are memorial books commemorating a Jewish community that was destroyed during the Holocaust. Books are usually published by former residents and records the remembrance of homes, people and ways of life lost during World War II. Most books are written in Yiddish or Hebrew, but in recent years, many have been translated and made available online. Take a look at the JewishGen Yizkor Book Project to locate a translation or Yizkor book for your locality of interest.

Additional Records - Finding Aids and Record Inventories[edit | edit source]

Miriam Weiner Routes to Roots Foundation[edit | edit source]

The Routes to Roots site contains articles, essays, maps, archivist insights, and an archival inventory for Jewish research in Moldova and other Eastern European countries. The website also contains a database of record inventories that is searchable by town. The search for documents in Eastern European ancestral towns is complicated, partly because of the destruction of documents during the Holocaust and changing borders and names. Only the first few letters of the town needs to be known, as all towns beginning with those letters will appear in the list. Some towns will even be cross-referenced with spelling variations or name changes. However, to determine the current spelling of a town, consult the JewishGen Gazetteer or Where Once We Walked by Mokotoff and Sack. The database will note the types of documents that has survived for that town, including army lists, Jewish vital records, family lists, census records, voter and tax lists, immigration documents, Holocaust material, school records, occupational lists, and more. The span of years covered by these documents and where to find them will also be provided. Records in the archives can be accessed on various websites or databases (such as JewishGen) in person at the archives, by writing to the archives directly, or by hiring a professional researcher to do the work.[1]

  • See Routes to Roots Foundation and hover over Moldova for a Genealogical and Family History guide to Jewish and civil records in Eastern Europe.

Jewish Roots[edit | edit source]

The Еврейские Корни (Jewish Roots) site is an excellent resource to help you locate archival documents. The website is in Russian, but if you are using the Google Chrome browser, simply right click anywhere on the page and select Translate to English. Search using the name of the town (find the Cyrillic spelling of the town on JewishGen Town Finder) to see what archival records might be available for your location. In addition to the database, use the Forum to connect with other researchers and find other potential resources for your location.

Reading Records[edit | edit source]

Moldovan/Bessarabian Jewish records are most commonly written in Russian or Hebrew. Use the resources in this list to help you learn how to read the records. You may also consider using a free translation service such as the FamilySearch Community (Be sure to post in the Russian Empire Genealogy Research group or tag @RussianEmpireGenealogyResearch in your question) or JewishGen View Mate.

Russian[edit | edit source]

Hebrew[edit | edit source]

Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

Miriam Weiner Routes to Roots Foundation[edit | edit source]

Data regarding locations of Moldovan Jewish records originally published in books by Miriam Weiner is now on this website with periodic updates. Contains articles, essays, maps, archivist insights, and archival inventory for Jewish research in Moldova. The website also contains a database of documents that is searchable by town. The search for documents in Eastern Europe ancestral towns is complicated, partly because of the destruction of documents during the Holocaust and changing borders and names. Only the first few letters of the town needs to be known, as all towns beginning with those letters will appear in the list. Some towns will even be cross-referenced with spelling variations or name changes. However, to determine the current spelling of a town, consult Where Once We Walked by Mokotoff and Sack (Avotaynu, 1991). The database will note the types of documents that has survived for that town, including army lists, Jewish vital records, family lists, census records, voter and tax lists, immigration documents, Holocaust material, school records, occupational lists, and more. The span of years covered by these documents and where to find them will also be provided. Records in the archives can be accessed on various websites or databases (such as JewishGen) in person at the archives, by writing to the archives directly, or by hiring a professional researcher to do the work. By consolidating data from five Eastern European countries, researchers can easily determine which records are kept by which archives or repositories.[2]

  • See Routes to Roots Foundation and hover over Moldova for a Genealogical and Family History guide to Jewish and civil records in Eastern Europe
  • See also the book, Jewish roots in Ukraine and Moldova by Miriam Weiner (FamilySearch Catalog call no. 947.71 F2w 1999)

References[edit | edit source]

Volhynia Gubernia Record Type Year Range
Dubno (Дубенский/Dubensky) Revision Lists 1850-1858
Zhitomir (Житомирский/Zhitomirsky) Revision Lists 1795-1858
Zaslav (Заславский/Zaslavsky) Metrical Books

Census

1845-1881

1898

Kowel (Ковельский/Kovelsky) Revision Lists 1874
Kremenets/Krzemieniec (Кременцкий/Krementsky) Revision Lists 1858
Lutsk/Łuck (Лутский/Lutsky) Census 1938
Novograd-Volynsky (Новоград-Волинський) Revision Lists

Family Lists

Registration Lists

1795-1858

1860-1882

1944

Ovruch (Овруцький/Ovrutsky) Revision Lists

Census

1858-1866

1938

Rovno (Рiвненьский/Rivnensky) Census 1938-1939
Starokonstantinov (Старокостянтинiвськой) Revision Lists

Metrical Books

1811-1858

1866-1916

Transcarpathia Gubernia Record Type Year Range
Ekaterinoslav Gubernia Record Type Year Range
Ekaterinoslav (Катеринославський/Yekaterinslavsky) Metrical Books

Voter Lists

1858-1891

1912

Kiev Gubernia Record Type Year Range
Vaskilkov (Василькiвський/Vasilkivsky) Revision Lists

Family Lists

Census

Various Lists

Metrical Records

School Records

Misc. Records?

1795-1860

1833, 1851

1897

Varies

1849-1919

1875-1919

???

Zvenigorodka (Звенигородьский/Zvenigorodsky) Revision Lists

Family Lists

Census

Metrical Records

Misc. Records

1795-1858

1862-1874

1875

1846-1866

1882-1915

???

Kanev/Boguslav (Канiвський/Kanivsky) Revision Lists

Family Lists

Voter Lists

Census

Various Lists

Misc. Records

1795-1818

1871-1874

1906

1897

1798-1913

???-1913

Kiev (Київський/Kievsky) Revision Lists 1795-1858



References[edit | edit source]

  1. Weiner, Miriam. "Eastern European Archival Database Planned". AVOTAYNU XVII no. 3 (Fall 2001): 3-5.
  2. Weiner, Miriam. "Eastern European Archival Database Planned". AVOTAYNU XVII no. 3 (Fall 2001): 3-5.