Talk:Mexico Genealogy

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I added the "Si usted entiende español" section as a test to: (1) invite those who understand Spanish to visit the Spanish wiki -which is still in a very basic stage-, (2) recruit contributors for the Spanish wiki and (3) start linking/syncing of contents between the English and Spanish wiki for the Spanish-Speaking country pages. According to the results, other languages might think in a similar approach. (GomezFJ)


The little text box to the left that has a link to expert help in Mexico research has a link that goes nowhere. The results page has zero results for Mexico. Should this be removed or is there something else available to link to?

I have added in several places the learning center's page for Latin American Research. That should be a good help for those getting started.

--Carol B. Moss 00:11, 29 December 2011 (UTC)


The link to the learning center's page for Latin American Research added by Carol does not have any results on it.  There is a learning center help page in Spanish on the Wiki.  

Featured Article Committee

It appears that problems noted on this page have been corrected. averyld 16:48, 16 April 2013 (UTC)


OLD CONTENT[edit source]

Mexico Orthographic Globe.svg.png


Featured Content[edit source]

In 1568, Phillip II decreed that the Moors should abandon their names and adopt Spanish names. Thus, some Moorish names such as Ben-egas became Venegas.

The additional four influences that played a part in the development of Spanish surnames were patronymic, occupational, descriptive or nickname, and geographical (estates, manors, and dominions) terms. Read more...

Did You Know[edit source]

Land records are primarily used to learn where an individual lived and when he or she lived there. They often reveal other information, such as the name of a spouse, heir, other relatives, or neighbors. You may learn where a person lived previously, his or her occupation, and other clues for further research. Read more...