Difference between revisions of "Kittanning Path"

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=== This page is currently under construction for use in a little tutorial on writing short articles.   ===
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{{breadcrumb
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| link1=[[United_States_Genealogy|United States]]
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| link2=[[United_States_Migration_Internal|Migration]]
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| link3=[[US_Migration_Rivers_and_Lakes|Migration Rivers and Lakes]]
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| link5=[[Kittanning_Path|Kittanning Path]]
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[[Image:Delaware Indians and William Penn.jpg]]
  
This will be a rough draft, not a finished product.&nbsp; It will be used to demonstrate a way to research and rough draft at the same time.&nbsp; Remember:&nbsp; <u>Rough Draft</u>&nbsp; No worries at this time about anything but committing research information to the page.&nbsp; (I'll have the article finished in its polished form by 1 PM MST.)&nbsp; There will be three primary stages of your article: Rough Draft, Writing the article, Polishing the article which will include adding links, changing headings, adding a photo, editing the finished product.<br>
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=== Early History of Trails ===
  
=== Here are some points to remember: <br> ===
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Historical trails, often called "traces" or "paths" contributed to the migration and settlement of large portions of the United States. Many trails were well established by the time Europeans immigrated to the colonies. The original 'travelers' on the trails were probably various types of wildlife as they moved from place to place in search of grazing lands, salt sources and fresh water. Native Americans were familiar with trails and utilized them for thousands of years prior to settlement by Europeans. The paths were also used to wage war, thus the term: “War Path”. Because they were often well worn, relatively easy to follow and led to grazing lands and fresh water Europeans utilized them as well on foot, horseback and with wagons. Many of these trails, or portions of them, were eventually utilized in the construction of roads and highways in modern times. <br>  
  
=== Plagiarism: the outright copying of another writer's work.&nbsp; It is illegal and if done in a venue such as our Wiki, can lead to legal consequences if discovered. <br> ===
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=== Location of Kittanning Path ===
  
=== Paraphrasing: Part of the research process, it involves gathering information and facts from other sources and paraphrasing what you find, versus copying what you find. None of us are going to travel to Pennsylvania, measure the pathway and gather information at it's source. Instead, we will read the information gathered by others and paraphrase, picking and choosing which pieces of information are useful to us. Here are some generalized points about paraphrasing: <br> ===
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The path ran in a generally East to West pattern running from the Juniata River in modern day central Pennsylvania to the Indian village of "Kithanick" (now known as Kittanning, Pennsylvania). It crossed the Allegheny mountains on its way.&nbsp; It wound through the counties of [[Cambria County, Pennsylvania Genealogy|Cambria]], Indiana, through Shelocta, and ended at Kittanning in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania on the western bank of the Allegheny River. In the early 1700s the area was inhabited by the Lenape [[Delaware Indians|(Delaware)]] Indians) and [[Shawnee Indians|Shawnee]].&nbsp; <br>  
  
1)Never copy a sentence.<br>
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=== History ===
  
2)Change wording at least every 5-7 words.<br>
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It is known that the Kittanning Path was in use by 1721 but it had been utilized prior to the time by First Nations People. John Hart, a white trader, was given a license to trade with the Native Americans in that area in 1744. Lands in the western portion of modern-day Pennsylvania were closed at that time to white settlements by treaty agreement with William Penn. Mr. Hart constructed a camp ground for over night travelers on the path, naming it: "Hart's Sleeping Place". Maps of the day marked the camp's location and records of its use were kept at the wayside. In 1754, John Harris, the founder of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania stayed at the Camp on a trip into the area.  
  
3)Often the ending of a sentence can be used as the beginning of your own sentence.<br>
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In 1755 the Lenape, unhappy with the treaties that took much of their land, used the path to wage war against a British settlement at the Juniata River.&nbsp; Prisoners were taken to the village of Kithanink. Again in 1756 the path was used by the Lenape as they attacked and burned Fort Granville (near modern-day Lewistown, Pennsylvania). There was loss of life and prisoners were captured and taken to Kithanink. In retribution the British sent Lt. Colonel John Armstrong (born in 1717 in Ireland) who ordered the burning of the village of Kithanick. Mr. Armstrong was later a general in the Revolutionary War and Armstrong county is named for him. After 1781, there are no records of Native Americans using the trail.  
  
4)Look for words that can be substituted for words that are common in the article:<br>
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=== Present Day  ===
  
&nbsp;&nbsp; a) Area, location, locale and Vicinity can frequently be interchangably<br>
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A portion of the path has been surveyed and preserved near Carrolltown, Pennsylvania.&nbsp; U.S. Highway 422 follows the original trail going North Northwest through Indiana County to Shelocta County in Pennsylvania.
  
&nbsp;&nbsp; b) Living, inhabiting, lived, inhabited, resided in, can be interchanged<br>
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Penn<br>  
  
&nbsp;&nbsp; c)&nbsp; Native American, First Nation People, American Indian Tribe, Cherokee people, Choctaw people, etc.&nbsp; (Never terms like Redskins, Indians etc.) Be PC.<br>
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[[Category:Pennsylvania Migration Routes]]
 
 
'''First Action''': Split your screen into a research page and a writing page.&nbsp; You can either work on the new page or your sandbox, depending on how much time you feel you'll need to complete the article.<br>
 
 
 
'''Second Action''': Place your links.&nbsp;&nbsp; You can make them pretty later on, just get them in first so that you don't forget them. At the bottom of most pages there is a section for Categories.&nbsp; Further reading and research can be done on those articles as well and, if information is taken from those pages, add a link to them.<br>
 
 
 
'''Third Action:'''&nbsp; What do you plan to emphasize? What is the purpose of the article? Migratory Routes? Information about Native Americans? Information about the state itself? Categorize your article.&nbsp; It helps you not to forget to categorize, but more importantly, it helps you to stay focused on your emphasis.
 
 
 
== Getting Started:&nbsp; <br> ==
 
add your link:&nbsp; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kittanning_Path<br>
 
 
 
add your categories: [[Category:Pennsylvania]] [[ Category:Indians of the United States]]
 
 
 
Begin your page by reading the article you are researching.&nbsp; Decide how you want to arrange your article.&nbsp; For this article, let's use <u>Chronological order</u>. This article basically breaks down into four sub headings: Earliest History, Geographic Description, Historic Uses, Modern Day Preservation&nbsp; If you prefer other titles, feel free to use whichever titles for your sub headings that you like.&nbsp; <br>
 
 
 
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Latest revision as of 10:50, 11 April 2018

Delaware Indians and William Penn.jpg

Early History of Trails[edit | edit source]

Historical trails, often called "traces" or "paths" contributed to the migration and settlement of large portions of the United States. Many trails were well established by the time Europeans immigrated to the colonies. The original 'travelers' on the trails were probably various types of wildlife as they moved from place to place in search of grazing lands, salt sources and fresh water. Native Americans were familiar with trails and utilized them for thousands of years prior to settlement by Europeans. The paths were also used to wage war, thus the term: “War Path”. Because they were often well worn, relatively easy to follow and led to grazing lands and fresh water Europeans utilized them as well on foot, horseback and with wagons. Many of these trails, or portions of them, were eventually utilized in the construction of roads and highways in modern times.

Location of Kittanning Path[edit | edit source]

The path ran in a generally East to West pattern running from the Juniata River in modern day central Pennsylvania to the Indian village of "Kithanick" (now known as Kittanning, Pennsylvania). It crossed the Allegheny mountains on its way.  It wound through the counties of Cambria, Indiana, through Shelocta, and ended at Kittanning in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania on the western bank of the Allegheny River. In the early 1700s the area was inhabited by the Lenape (Delaware) Indians) and Shawnee

History[edit | edit source]

It is known that the Kittanning Path was in use by 1721 but it had been utilized prior to the time by First Nations People. John Hart, a white trader, was given a license to trade with the Native Americans in that area in 1744. Lands in the western portion of modern-day Pennsylvania were closed at that time to white settlements by treaty agreement with William Penn. Mr. Hart constructed a camp ground for over night travelers on the path, naming it: "Hart's Sleeping Place". Maps of the day marked the camp's location and records of its use were kept at the wayside. In 1754, John Harris, the founder of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania stayed at the Camp on a trip into the area.

In 1755 the Lenape, unhappy with the treaties that took much of their land, used the path to wage war against a British settlement at the Juniata River.  Prisoners were taken to the village of Kithanink. Again in 1756 the path was used by the Lenape as they attacked and burned Fort Granville (near modern-day Lewistown, Pennsylvania). There was loss of life and prisoners were captured and taken to Kithanink. In retribution the British sent Lt. Colonel John Armstrong (born in 1717 in Ireland) who ordered the burning of the village of Kithanick. Mr. Armstrong was later a general in the Revolutionary War and Armstrong county is named for him. After 1781, there are no records of Native Americans using the trail.

Present Day[edit | edit source]

A portion of the path has been surveyed and preserved near Carrolltown, Pennsylvania.  U.S. Highway 422 follows the original trail going North Northwest through Indiana County to Shelocta County in Pennsylvania.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Penn