Difference between revisions of "Kingston, Dorset Genealogy"

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=== Parish History  ===
 
=== Parish History  ===
  
[[Image:Kingston St James, Dorset - 1880.jpg|thumb|left]] Kingston has two 19th century church buildings. In 1833 {{wpd|John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon}} commissioned a building to replace a chapel that has been established in the 12th century. This building served as the parish church until 1922 when it was substituted for the church built by the {{wpd|Earl of Eldon|3rd Earl of Eldon}} originally built as his private chapel.  
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[[Image:Kingston St James, Dorset - 1880.jpg|thumb|left|Kingston St James, Dorset - 1880.jpg]] Kingston has two 19th century church buildings. In 1833 {{wpd|John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon}} commissioned a building to replace a chapel that has been established in the 12th century. This building served as the parish church until 1922 when it was substituted for the church built by the {{wpd|Earl of Eldon|3rd Earl of Eldon}} originally built as his private chapel.  
  
 
KINGSTON, or Kinson, a '''district chapelry''', in the '''parish''' of Canford-Magna, union of Poole, hundred of Cogdean, Wimborne division of Dorset, 1¾ mile (S.) from Corfe-Castle. The river Stour runs on the northern side of the chapelry. The chapel, dedicated to St. James, was built in 1833, and is a handsome edifice, containing the remains of Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, governor of Malta.<ref>Samuel A. Lewis, [http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51078#s2 ''A Topographical Dictionary of England]'', (1848), pp. 680-683. Date accessed: 07 July 2103. </ref>  
 
KINGSTON, or Kinson, a '''district chapelry''', in the '''parish''' of Canford-Magna, union of Poole, hundred of Cogdean, Wimborne division of Dorset, 1¾ mile (S.) from Corfe-Castle. The river Stour runs on the northern side of the chapelry. The chapel, dedicated to St. James, was built in 1833, and is a handsome edifice, containing the remains of Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, governor of Malta.<ref>Samuel A. Lewis, [http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51078#s2 ''A Topographical Dictionary of England]'', (1848), pp. 680-683. Date accessed: 07 July 2103. </ref>  
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==== Census records  ====
 
==== Census records  ====
  
{{British Census|241336}}
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{{British Census|241336}}  
  
 
In 1790 a census of Corfe Castle, undertaken by Reverend John Hutchins.<ref>{{Google book|RUI-AQAAIAAJ|History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset}}</ref>  
 
In 1790 a census of Corfe Castle, undertaken by Reverend John Hutchins.<ref>{{Google book|RUI-AQAAIAAJ|History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset}}</ref>  

Revision as of 10:56, 10 December 2014

England Gotoarrow.png Dorset Gotoarrow.png Dorset Parishes Gotoarrow.png Kingston

Kingston was a chapelry of Corfe Castle until 1877.

Kingston, Dorset
Kingston St James, Dorset - 1833.jpg
St James, Kingston parish church (1833-1922)
Type Chapelry
Civil Jurisdictions
Hundred Corfe Castle
County Dorset
Poor Law Union Wareham and Purbeck
Registration District Wareham
Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions
Diocese Salisbury
Province Canterbury
Legal Jurisdictions
Probate Court Court of the Peculiar of Corfe Castle

Parish History[edit | edit source]

Kingston St James, Dorset - 1880.jpg

Kingston has two 19th century church buildings. In 1833 John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon commissioned a building to replace a chapel that has been established in the 12th century. This building served as the parish church until 1922 when it was substituted for the church built by the 3rd Earl of Eldon originally built as his private chapel.

KINGSTON, or Kinson, a district chapelry, in the parish of Canford-Magna, union of Poole, hundred of Cogdean, Wimborne division of Dorset, 1¾ mile (S.) from Corfe-Castle. The river Stour runs on the northern side of the chapelry. The chapel, dedicated to St. James, was built in 1833, and is a handsome edifice, containing the remains of Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, governor of Malta.[1]

Resources[edit | edit source]

Civil Registration[edit | edit source]

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Church records[edit | edit source]

Census records[edit | edit source]

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library.


In 1790 a census of Corfe Castle, undertaken by Reverend John Hutchins.[2]

Probate records[edit | edit source]

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Dorset Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Websites[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Samuel A. Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England, (1848), pp. 680-683. Date accessed: 07 July 2103.
  2. History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset at Google Books