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Difference between revisions of "GuidedResearch:Why Can't I Find the Record - Netherlands Deaths"

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*Your ancestor's name may misspelled. Try the following search tactics:  
 
*Your ancestor's name may misspelled. Try the following search tactics:  
 
:*Try different spelling variations of the first and last name of your ancestor.
 
:*Try different spelling variations of the first and last name of your ancestor.
 +
:*Leave out surname prefixes such as "de", "van","van der" etc.
 
:*Try a given name search (leave out the last names)
 
:*Try a given name search (leave out the last names)
 +
:*Use wild cards, if possible, to represent phonetic variants, especially for surname endings. Example: "-bach" could also be spelled "bag" or "bagh".
 +
:*Consider phonetic equivalents that may be used interchangeably, such as "F" and "V", "C", "K", and "G"
 
*Expand the date range of the search.
 
*Expand the date range of the search.
 
*Try searching with the state name only instead of by county.
 
*Try searching with the state name only instead of by county.

Revision as of 11:01, 8 June 2018


This page will give you additional guidance and resources to find death information for your ancestor. Use this page after first completing the death section of the Netherlands Guided Research page.


Additional Records

[hide]



Church records are the main sources for births, marriages and deaths in the Netherlands between about 1550 and 1811. In the late 1500s Churches began to mandate that registers of baptisms and marriages were kept. Burials were often not recorded at first. Records do not always exist for the period before 1700. Some records have been lost. By 1 March 1811 all births, marriages and deaths had to be recorded by the civil authorities of each municipality.

To search these additional databases you need to know the province your ancestor came from. Note: New rights-to-privacy laws may require you to agree to user conditions before you can access records.

Additional Databases and Online Resources by Province

Use these additional records to locate death information about your ancestor:
Province
Website
Why to search the records
Drenthe
AlleDrenten
Indexes to civil registration and church records, with images.
Flevoland
[xx]
xx
Friesland
AlleFriezen
Civil registration records database with links to the original record image, church records database.
Gelderland
[xx]
xx
Groningen
AlleGroningers
Access to indexes and images of civil and church records.
Limburg
Genealogische Databank Limburg
Genealogical database.
North Brabant
Het geheugen van Brabant
Genealogical website for northeastern Noord-Brabant.
North Holland
Noord-Hollands Archief
Index to almost 350,000 persons linked to the respective documents.
Overijssel
Historisch Centrum Overijssel
Includes civil registration indexes.
South Holland
Nationaal Archief
Church records for most places in South Holland Province.
Utrecht
[xx]
Blocked.
Zeeland
Zeeuws Archief
Includes indexes to church records and civil registration.
Amsterdam
Stadsarchief Amsterdam
Indexes.






Substitute records

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Additional Records with Death Information

Substitute records can contain information about more than one event, and are used when records for an event are not available. Because the substitute records may not be created at the time of the event, it may contain incorrect information. Search for as many substitute records as possible to corroborate information found in substitute records to help improve accuracy.

Use these substitute records to locate death information about your ancestor:
Wiki Page
FamilySearch(FS) Collections
Why to search the records
Cemetery Records
[xx]
Tombstone inscriptions and records created when a deceased individual was interred in a cemetery.
Military Records
[xx]
May include any death information for servicemen who died in service.





Improve searching

[hide]


Tips for finding deaths

Success with finding death records in online databases depends on a few key points:

  • Your ancestor's name may misspelled. Try the following search tactics:
  • Try different spelling variations of the first and last name of your ancestor.
  • Leave out surname prefixes such as "de", "van","van der" etc.
  • Try a given name search (leave out the last names)
  • Use wild cards, if possible, to represent phonetic variants, especially for surname endings. Example: "-bach" could also be spelled "bag" or "bagh".
  • Consider phonetic equivalents that may be used interchangeably, such as "F" and "V", "C", "K", and "G"
  • Expand the date range of the search.
  • Try searching with the state name only instead of by county.
  • If your ancestor's name is common, try adding more information to narrow the search.




Why the record may not exist

[hide]


Known Record Gaps

Records Start

  • Ohio counties began registering deaths in 1867, although registration was incomplete for some counties. Statewide registration began in 1908 in Ohio.

Records Published
Collection coverage tables show the places and time periods of original records published. Check the coverage table for the collections you searched which did not include your ancestor. Gaps in the online collection may require searches in other records or original birth records at an archive.

Records destroyed
United States Counties With Records Loss shows which counties and when the loss happened. Zoom in to the state and click on a county marked in red to see date details.