Georgia Deaths - FamilySearch Historical Records

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Georgia Statewide Death Certificates Records[edit | edit source]

How To Use This Record[edit | edit source]

Death certificates are the best source of death information. The certificates contain clues for further research: the birth date and birthplace of the individual; the name of the spouse; the names of parents; the place of residence; the name of the informant who may be a child of the deceased. 

 

Why This Record Was Created[edit | edit source]

Deaths were recorded to better serve public health needs. They were also used in connection with the probate of wills and the administration of estates.

 

Record History[edit | edit source]

In 1919 Georgia law required the registration of deaths in the state. Some deaths were recorded for years before 1919. Prior to statewide registration, death records were recorded in some counties beginning in 1875.


Record Description
[edit | edit source]

Each death was recorded on a one-page pre-printed form.

Record Coverage[edit | edit source]

Georgia began records deaths in 1919. 

Though statewide registration was established in 1919, county officials were slow to respond to the law and most did not comply until 1928.


Record Content
[edit | edit source]

Important genealogical facts in death entries:

  • Dates of death and burial
  • Frequently, birth date of the deceased
  • City, county, and state of death
  • Name and location of the cemetery where buried
  • Frequently, the country or state and sometimes the town and county of birth for the deceased
  • Frequently, the country or state and sometimes the town and county of birth for the parents
  • Name of the deceased, married name of spouse, names of parents, often with maiden surname of the mother
  • Name of the informant, who is often a child or other family member
  • Age of the deceased usually in years, months, and days
  • Sex of the deceased
  • Residence or address of the deceased, often including length of residence at that place or in the United States, if foreign-born
  • Whether the deceased was single, married, widowed, or divorced at the time of death
  • Occupation of the deceased


Record Reliability[edit | edit source]

Information pertaining to death is reliable; including cause of death, name of the attending physician or medical professional, name and address of the funeral home used, and the exact date and place of burial. Other information is dependent upon the reliability of the informant.

 

Bibliographic Information[edit | edit source]

Georgia Department of Health and Vital Statistics. Certificate of death. From URL, date accessed or downloaded. Digital identification number if any, certificate number, name of individual, death date. Example: Georgia Department of Health and Vital Statistics. Certificate of death. From FamilySearch Internet (www.familysearch.org), September 29, 2006. Certificate 1576, Richard Bonner, 24 Feb 1918.

Georgia Department of Health and Vital Statistics. Certificate of death. Salt Lake City: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, [date], film number, item number, certificate number, name of individual, death date.