Wayne County, North Carolina Genealogy

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Guide to Wayne County, North Carolina ancestry, genealogy and family history, birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

County Facts
County seat: Goldsboro
Organized: 1779
Parent County(s): Dobbs[1]
Neighboring Counties
Duplin  • Greene  • Johnston  • Lenoir  • Sampson  • Wilson
See County Maps
Courthouse
Wayne County Courthouse, North Carolina.jpg
Location Map
Nc-wayne.png
Adoption
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Anthony Wayne

County Information[edit | edit source]

Description[edit | edit source]

Wayne County is named after Revolutionary War General "Mad" Anthony Wayne (1745-1796).[2] It is located in the east central area of the state.

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

Wayne County Courthouse
215 S William Street
PO Box 267
Goldsboro, NC 27530-4824
Phone: 919-731-1449
Wayne County Website

Register of Deeds has birth, marriage, death, burial and land records.
Clerk Superior Court has divorce, probate and court records.[3]

Wayne County, North Carolina Record Dates[edit | edit source]

Information for this chart was taken from various sources, often containing conflicting dates. This information should be taken as a guide and should be verified by contacting the county and/or the state government agency.

Known Beginning Dates for Major County Records[4]
Birth* Marriage Death* Court Land Probate Census
1913 1790 1913 1782 1780 1776 1784
Statewide registration for births and deaths started in 1913. General compliance by 1920.

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

1781 Fire burned courthouse, small record loss.

For suggestions about research in places that suffered historic record losses, see:

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

  • 1779 Wayne County was created from Dobbs County. Dobbs County was abolished in 1791.
  • County seat: Goldsboro[5]

For animated maps illustrating North Carolina county boundary changes, "Rotating Formation North Carolina County Boundary Maps" (1664-1965) may be viewed for free at the MapofUS.org website.

Populated Places[edit | edit source]

For a complete list of populated places, including small neighborhoods and suburbs, visit HomeTown Locator. The following are the most historically and genealogically relevant populated places in this county:[6]

Cities
Towns
Villages
Unincorporated communities
Census-designated places
Townships
  • Grantham
  • Hood Swamp
  • Indian Springs
  • Nahunta
  • New Hope
  • Pikeville
  • Saulston
  • Stoney Creek


History Timeline[edit | edit source]

Resources[edit | edit source]

Bible Records[edit | edit source]

Biographies[edit | edit source]

Business, Commerce, and Occupations[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries of Wayne County, North Carolina online and in print
Tombstone Transcriptions Online
Tombstone Transcriptions in Print (Often more complete)
List of Cemeteries in the County
See North Carolina Cemeteries for more information

 

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Censustp:/ Pop.
1790 6,115
1800 6,772 10.7%
1810 8,687 28.3%
1820 9,040 4.1%
1830 10,331 14.3%
1840 10,891 5.4%
1850 13,486 23.8%
1860 14,905 10.5%
1870 18,144 21.7%
1880 24,951 37.5%
1890 26,100 4.6%
1900 31,356 20.1%
1910 35,698 13.8%
1920 43,640 22.2%
1930 53,013 21.5%
1940 58,328 10.0%
1950 64,267 10.2%
1960 82,059 27.7%
1970 85,408 4.1%
1980 97,054 13.6%
1990 104,666 7.8%
2000 113,329 8.3%
2010 122,623 8.2%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".


Church Records[edit | edit source]

Baptist

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Ward and Branch Records of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

  • Goldsboro
  • Mount Olive


List of Churches and Church Parishes

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Directories[edit | edit source]

Emigration and Immigration[edit | edit source]

Ethnic, Political, and Religious Groups[edit | edit source]

  • African American Resources for North Carolina-Resources for African American research fall into two periods: pre-and post-Civil War. Post-Civil War research consists of consulting the same record types as non-African-Americans. Pre-Civil War records consist of slave importation declarations, plantation records, emancipation records, apprenticeship bonds for freedmen, North Carolina hiring practices, census records, white family records, church and cemetery records, military records, vital records, and numerous North Carolina court records. African American vital records were usually recorded in separate books for many years.
  • AAHGS NC Triangle Facebook Page - Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society
  • Voter Registration Under the Grandfather Clause: Wayne CountyNorth Carolina Free People of Color- ncfpc.net

Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

  • Haskins Funeral Home
    601 E Ash St, Goldsboro, NC 27530
    (919) 736-5000
    haskinsfh.com
  • Howell Funeral Home & Crematory
    1500 Wayne Memorial Dr, Goldsboro, NC 27534
    (919) 731-7490
    howellfuneral.com
  • McIntyre Funeral Home
    1215 Royall Ave, Goldsboro, NC 27534
    (919) 731-7174
    mcintyrefuneralhome.com

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

Guardianship[edit | edit source]

Land and Property Records[edit | edit source]

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

NC Wayne

Migration[edit | edit source]

Military Records[edit | edit source]

Revolutionary War

Civil War

Regiments. Men in Wayne County served in various regiments. Men often joined a company (within a regiment) that originated in their county. Listed below are companies that were specifically formed in Wayne County:

- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
- 4th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
- 13th Battalion, North Carolina Infantry, Company C
- 1st Regiment, North Carolina Artillery 10th Regiment Volunteers-1st Artillery, Company F
- 1st Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Company H
- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, 2nd Company C
- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company D
- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company H
- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Junior Reserves, Company A
- 4th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company D
- 8th Regiment, North Carolina Senior Reserves, Captain James M Garner's Company
- 8th Battalion, North Carolina Cavalry (Partisan Rangers), 4th Company

Civil War Battles
The following Civil War battles were fought in Wayne County:

Genealogy of the United States Colored Troops:USCT pension file will be ordered. Two files per month to place on the IAAM Center for Family History website. Post the pension index card here to order pension file.

135th Colored US Troops
March 27, 1865 General William T. Sherman organized the 135th United States Colored Troop in Goldsboro, North Carolina toward the end of the civil war in March of 1865. The 135th USCT consisted of 1,154 men that joined the army from the rolls of a pioneer corps, that had been with General Sherman, since leaving Savannah, Georgia. This “Lost Troop” of freedom seekers, the 135th USCT, marched with Sherman’s army out of Goldsboro to Raleigh, NC, at the end of the war. They then trudged on to Washington, DC and on May 24, 1865 the 135th USCT paraded with Sherman’s army in the Grand Review, carrying their regimental flag. After a brief stay performing guard duty in the nation’s capital they then transferred to Louisville, KY, performing garrison duty, in Kentucky and Indiana. The 135th USCT was subsequently mustered out of service at the end of October 1865.

From research, and official pension records, we can tell the story of the men of the 135th USCT from slavery, to their army lives and their lives after service in the army. Their life stories are told “In Their Own Words,” from their pension application records, depositions and in-depth research.
The 135th United States Colored Troops
135th US Colored Troop Facebook Page
135thusct@gmail.com
(805) 990-1537

World War I

World War II

Naturalization and Citizenship[edit | edit source]

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

Obituaries[edit | edit source]

(See Newspapers above)

Other Records[edit | edit source]

Periodicals[edit | edit source]

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

Online Probate Records

School Records[edit | edit source]

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Tax Records[edit | edit source]

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Birth[edit | edit source]

Marriage[edit | edit source]

Death[edit | edit source]

Divorce[edit | edit source]

Yearbooks[edit | edit source]

Research Facilities[edit | edit source]

Archives[edit | edit source]

[1]

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance, free access to center-only databases, and to premium genealogical websites.
FamilySearch Affiliate Libraries have access to most center-only databases, but may not always have full services normally provided by a family history center.

Local Centers and Libraries

Libraries[edit | edit source]

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Museums[edit | edit source]

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Societies[edit | edit source]

Websites[edit | edit source]

  • USGenWeb project. May have maps, name indexes, history or other information for this county. Select the state, then the county.
  • FamilySearch Catalog – The FamilySearch catalog contains descriptions and access information for all genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, and publications) in their collection.  Use Historical Records to search for specific individuals in genealogical records.
  • Lowcountry Africana- Lowcountry Africana is entirely dedicated to records that document the family and cultural heritage of African Americans in the historic rice-growing areas of South Carolina, Georgia and extreme northeastern Florida, an area that scholars and preservationists have identified as a distinct culture area. Lowcountry Africana was developed with a grant from the Magnolia Plantation Foundation of Charleston, South Carolina.
  • North Carolina Museum of African Americans' History & Culture - An ONLINE Educational Museum

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  2. "Anthony Wayne," Wikipedia
  3. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  4. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), Wayne County, North Carolina. Page 506-514 At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002; Alice Eichholz, ed. Ancestry’s Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, Third ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 505-509.
  5. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  6. Wikipedia contributors, "Wayne County, North Carolina," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayne_County,_North_Carolina, accessed 1 March 2020.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 George Washington Paschal, History of North Carolina Baptists, 2 vols. (1930; reprint, Gallatin, Tenn.: Church History Research and Archives, 1990), 1:490-491; 2:569. FHL Book 975.6 K2p 1990.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Lemuel Burkitt and Jesse Read, A Concise History of the Kehukee Baptist Association: From Its Original Rise Down to 1808 (1808), Chapter 16. Digital version at archive.org.
  9. Heritage Preservation Services, Civil War Battle Summaries by State, (accessed 8 August, 2012)
  10. Heritage Preservation Services, Civil War Battle Summaries by State, (accessed 9 August, 2012)
  11. Genealogical Society of Utah, Parish and Vital Records List (July 1998). Microfiche. Digital version at https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/images/f/f5/Iginorthcarolinap.pdf.
  12. Genealogical Society of Utah, Parish and Vital Records List (July 1998). Microfiche. Digital version at https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/images/f/f5/Iginorthcarolinap.pdf.