St Austell, Cornwall Genealogy

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Guide to St Austell, Cornwall ancestry, family history, and genealogy: parish registers, transcripts, census records, birth records, marriage records, and death records.

St Austell, Cornwall
Type Ancient Parish
Civil Jurisdictions
Hundred Powder
County Cornwall
Poor Law Union St Austell
Registration District St Austell
Records begin
Parish registers: 1564
Bishop's Transcripts: 1611
Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions
Rural Deanery Powder
Diocese Exeter
Province Canterbury
Legal Jurisdictions
Probate Court Court of the Bishop (Consistory) of the Archdeaconry of Cornwall
Location of Archive
Cornwall Record Office

Parish History[edit | edit source]

AUSTELL, ST. (The Holy Trinity), a market town, parish, and the head of a union, in the E. division of the hundred of Powder and of the county of Cornwall, 34 miles (S. W.) from Launceston, and 252 (W. S. W.) from London. There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, Calvinists, the Society of Friends, Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists, Warrenites, and Plymouth Brethren. [1]

A once-large parish of 11,450 acres, located in the hundred of Powder, on the south-eastern coast of Cornwall, St Austell did not appear in the Domesday book, but by 1292 was recognized as a separate entity, part of the territory held and administered by Tywardreath priory until the dissolution of the monasteries. There were also manors of Tewington and Trenance, as well as Treverbyn.

The main town also carries the name, and when most people refer to St. Austell now, they most often intend to refer to the town.

The parish church, originally dedicated to Saint Austell (Austol, Austle), an Irish mendicant who arrived in Cornwall with St. Mewan, was re-dedicated to the Holy Trinity, perhaps when the church tower of Pentewan stone was erected in the 1480's. It has been called "a bible in stone", with sculptures illustrating not only the Holy Trinity, but all the apostles, and the 2 Irish saints as well. The church was remodeled in the 1490's, and again in the mid 1840's by St. Aubyn in his well-known style, but some remnants of the original church remain.

The parish was of modest importance until Wm. Cookworthy discovered the use of china clay in 1759, and shortly thereafter it was discovered the parish was rich in this resource; it has since been proven to be one of the top 5 sources of pure china clay in the world. Previously, tin and copper mining had been a mainstay of the parish, but their importance diminished while the china clay mines grew. In 1804, it was estimated 1,400 persons lived in St. Austell. In 1844, when the market for Cornish tin crashed, and subsequently miners found themselves out of work, the china clay mines continued producing - and people moved into the parish, raising the population to over 10,000.

Today, the population is estimated at over 28,000; it is the largest town in Cornwall.

References[edit | edit source]

Find Neighboring Parishes[edit | edit source]

Use England Jurisdictions 1851 Map

  • Type the name of the parish in the search bar
  • Click on the location pin on the map
  • Choose Options from the pop up box
  • Click "List Contiguous Parishes" to find the neighboring parishes

Church Records[edit | edit source]

Church records[edit | edit source]

The Church of England (Anglican) became the official state religion in 1534, with the reigning monarch as its Supreme Governor.
Non-Conformist refers to all other religious denominations that are not the official state religion.

Church of England[edit | edit source]

Due to the increasing access of online records:

  • Individual parish coverage for databases in this table are inconsistent and should be verified
  • Dates in the following table are approximate

Hover over the collection's title for more information

St Austell Online Parish Records
Collections
Baptisms
Marriages
Burials
Indexes and images
Indexes only
Indexes and images
Indexes only
Indexes and images
Indexes only
FamilySearch Collections-Cornwall
1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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FamilySearch Parish Registers-Cornwall
1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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Bishop's Transcripts - FamilySearch Catalog
1700s-1800s
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1700s-1800s
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1700s-1800s
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FreeREG
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1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
Find My Past-Cornwall ($)
1500s-1900s
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1500s-1900s
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1500s-1800s
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Ancestry-Church of England BMD-Cornwall ($)
1500s-2000s
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1500s-2000s
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1500s-2000s
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Ancestry-England & Wales, Birth, Christening, Marriage and Death Indexes ($)
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1800s-1900s
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1800s-1900s
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1800s-1900s
Databases with Known Incomplete Parish Coverage
Boyd's Marriage Indexes-FMP (Free)
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1500s-1800s
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National Burial Index-FMP (Free)
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1800s-1900s

Other Websites
These databases have incomplete parish coverage.

Non-Conformists (All other Religions)[edit | edit source]

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library.


Online Records[edit | edit source]

Transcriptions on the St. Austell Genealogy and History website contain baptism, marriage, and burial records from 1565 to 1900 from Holy Trinity Church of England registers, as well as several Non-Conformist chapels and Society of Friends, for Free. The same site has the 1841 Tithes Index, Manorial records of tenants, Voter registrations, and entries from "Directories" 1797 through 1875, as well as many other records.

The Cornwall OPC database has some of the same records for Free viewing, as well as records from the rest of Cornwall, which can be very helpful to researchers should their families move. The Cornwall Family History Society has put their transcriptions of BMDs on the fee-based site, FindMyPast. They also have completed the St. Austell section of their Memorial Index project, which may be of great help to a researcher since many cemeteries have closed, moved and even been turned into a park.

Should a problem or question arise, it may be advisable to seek assistance from Cornwall Archives and Libraries for examination of the original entry in the volume of the registers.

St. Austell Union Workhouse[edit | edit source]

The St. Austell Union Workhouse was built in 1837, with a capacity for 300 residents and the capability of serving several parishes until 1930, when all such workhouses were abolished. Afterward, the building fell victim to an arsonist. According to the Cornwall Record Office, workhouse information regarding individual inmates in the form of records such as admission and discharge registers no longer exist. All that remain deal with buildings and finance, which would not be of interest to a genealogist.

Census data from 1841 through 1891 is available on the St. Austell History and Genealogy website, as well as FreeCENS. A photograph of the workhouse, and a sample diet is also available on the St. Austell Genealogy site.

St. Austell Registration District[edit | edit source]

After births, marriages and deaths were required by law to be reported to governmental Registrars in 1837, Registration Districts were established. One of these was named "St. Austell". It should not be confused with the parish.

When utilizing the FreeBMD database at RootsWeb, the Registration District will be shown. Any of the parishes in the District may have the desired information.

As of 2002, the Registration District comprised the following parishes:

  • Charlestown
  • Colan
  • Crantock
  • Fowey
  • Grampound with Creed
  • Lanlivery
  • Luxulyan
  • Lostwithiel
  • Mawgan-in-Pydar
  • Mevagissey
  • Newquay
  • Roche
  • St. Austell (St. Austle)
  • St. Blazey (St. Blaise)
  • St. Columb Major
  • St. Columb Minor
  • St. Dennis
  • St. Enoder
  • St. Ewe
  • St. Goran
  • St. Mewan
  • St. Michael Caerhays
  • St. Sampson
  • St. Stephens in Brannel
  • St. Wenn
  • Treverbyn
  • Tywardreath

As any of these parishes might contain the requisite information, it might be best to access the Cornwall Online Parish Clerk database as it covers all of Cornwall, rather than an individual parish.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Lewis, Samuel A., A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 112-116. Date accessed: 20 March 2013.

"CORNWALL and It's People", A.K. Hamilton-Jenkin, David & Charles, London, 1945 & 1988

"ST. AUSTELL: Church, Town, and Parish", A.L. Rowse, H.E. Warne, LTD, 1960

"ST. AUSTELL, A Cornish Parish" Canon Joseph Hammond,L.L.B., Skeffington & Son, London, 1897

"A CORNISH CHILDHOOD" A.L. ROWSE, Clarkson N. Potter, Inc/Crown Publishers Inc, New York. 1942 & 1979

"HISTORIC CORNWALL - St. Austell" , Kate Newell, Historic Environmental Service, Cornwall County Council, 2004, at http://www.historic-cornwall.org.uk/csus/towns/staustell/staustell [If this address does not work, go to historic-cornwall.org.uk, and click on Cornwall and Scilly Urban Survey, then "towns"; you can then enter "St. Austell" to see the reports and download a map of the area circa 1907]

"The Archaeology of the St. Austell China Clay Area" P. Herring and J. Smith, Historic Environment Service, Cornwall County Council, 1991

Websites[edit | edit source]