Lebanon Church Records

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For information about records for non-Christian religions in Lebanon, go to the Religious Records page.

Online Resources and Websites[edit | edit source]

Ancestry.com, findmypast.com, and MyHeritage.com can be searched free of charge at your local family history center or the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The number of Christians in Lebanon has been disputed for many years. There has been no official census in Lebanon since 1932. The country is believed to have the largest percentage of Christians of all the Middle Eastern nations.

The Maronite Church, an Eastern Catholic church in full communion with the Catholic Church, is the largest and politically most active and influential denomination of Lebanon's Christians. The Catholic Church also includes other Eastern Catholic churches, such as the Melkite Catholic Church. The Eastern Orthodox Church forms the second largest proportion of Lebanese Christians. The Armenian Apostolic Church also forms a large portion of the Christian population in Lebanon.

The other six smaller Christian sects are considered ethnic Assyrians: (Syriac Orthodox, Syriac Catholics, Assyrian Church of the East and Chaldean Catholics).

Most Protestants in Lebanon were converted by missionaries, primarily English and American, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They are divided into a number of denominations, including Presbyterian, Congregational, and Anglican. They live primarily in Beirut (Greater Beirut).[1]

Information Recorded in the Records[edit | edit source]

Different denominations, different time periods, and practices of different record keepers will effect how much information can be found in the records. This outline will show the types of details which might be found (best case scenario):

Baptisms[edit | edit source]

In Catholic and Anglican records, children were usually baptized a few days after birth, and therefore, the baptism record proves date of birth. Other religions, such as Baptists, baptized at other points in the member's life. Baptism registers might give:

  • baptism date
  • the infant's name
  • parents' names
  • father's occupation
  • status of legitimacy
  • occasionally, names of grandparents
  • names of witnesses or godparents, who may be relatives
  • birth date and place
  • the family's place of residence
  • death information, as an added note or signified by a cross

Marriages[edit | edit source]

Marriage registers can give:

  • the marriage date
  • the names of the bride and groom
  • indicate whether the bride and groom were single or widowed
  • their ages
  • birth dates and places for the bride and groom
  • their residences
  • their occupations
  • birthplaces of the bride and groom
  • parents' names (after 1800)
  • the names of previous spouses and their death dates
  • names of witnesses, who might be relatives.

Burials[edit | edit source]

Burial registers may give:

  • the name of the deceased
  • the date and place of death or burial
  • the deceased's age
  • place of residence
  • cause of death
  • the names of survivors, especially a widow or widower
  • deceased's birth date and place
  • parents' names, or at least the father's name



How to Find Records[edit | edit source]

Digital Copies of Church Records in the FamilySearch Catalog[edit | edit source]

Watch for digitized copies of church records to be added to the collection of the FamilySearch Library. Some records might have viewing restrictions, and can only be viewed at a Family History Center near you, and/or by members of supporting organizations. To find records:

a. Click on the records of Lebanon.
b. Click on Places within Lebanon and a list of towns will appear.
c. Click on your town if it appears, or the location which you believe was the parish which served your town or village.
d. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the listing for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the record is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the records.

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

You will probably need to write to or email the national archives, the diocese, or local parish priests to find records. See Letter Writing Guide for Genealogy for help with composing letters. If you know the church your ancestor attended, contact it directly. Church records have not been catalogued, but they do exist. For example, church records for the Maronite and Armenian communities in Aleppo date back to the mid-19th century. If you can write your letter in Arabic or know someone who will write it for you, do that, or use a Arabic translation services. If that is not possible, write the letter in English. Most areas have someone who can translate for the recipient.

Protestant Church Records[edit | edit source]

Protestant
Church Name Landline Mobile Fax Address Email
National Evangelical Synod of Syria and Lebanon 961 4 411184 961 3 086633 Beirut, Antelias, P.O. Box 70890
Union of the Armenian Evangelical Churches in the Near East 961 1 443547 961 3 628736 961 1 565629 Beirut
National Evangelical Church of Beirut 961 1 980051/ 961 1 980052 961 3 690112 961 1 980050 Riad Essoulh, Beirut, P.O.Box 11-5224 nec.beirut@t-net.com.lb
General Assembly of Church of God In Lebanon and Syria 961 1 364212 961 3 643373 Ashrafieh, Salam school street, Beirut P.O.Box 167078
Evangelical Episcopal Church in Lebanon and Syria 961 1 743768 961 3 344577 9611739764 Beirut, Lebanon, P.O. 11-2211 imadzoorob@gmail.com
General Assembly of Evangelical Baptist Churches in lebanon 961 4 980392 961 3 638026 Baptist Evangelical Church,Bikfaya
Seventh-day Adventist Church 961 1 692304/ 961 1 692305 961 3 745892 961 1 692303 Middle East University, Sabtieh, Beirut, P.O Box 91028 Jdeidet El Matn
Evangelical Christian Alliance Church 961 1 240535 961 3 246411 Beirut, P.O Box 90984 Jdeidet El Matn
Nazarene evangelical church 961 1 480316 961 3 362030 961 1 480316 Ain El Remaneh, Abou Atme Building, Beirut P.O Box 55169 Sin El Fil
Evangelical Free Church 961 1 613324/961 1 613327 961 3 378813 Corniche du fleuve, 1020 Company Building, Achrafieh, Beirut P.O Box 11/5286

Anglican (Episcopal) Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Congregational Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Presbyterian Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Catholic Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing to a Local Parish[edit | edit source]

Roman Catholic Church[edit | edit source]

Roman Catholic Parishes
City Parishes Landline Fax Address
Beirut 8 961 9 236101 961 9 236102 Villa St Joseph, Sector 1, Street 22, Jeita, Kesrouane

Melkite Greek Catholic[edit | edit source]

Melkite Greek Catholic Parishes
City Landline Mobile Fax Address
Beirut and Jbeil 961 1 616104 -9 Damsacus Road, Beirut
Banias and Marjaayoun 961 7 830007 Marjaayoun, South
Tripoli 961 6 631716/ 961 6 621602 961 3 638550 Tripoli, Moutran Street, North
Saida and Deir El Qamar 961 7 723109/ 961 7 720100 961 3 241825 Moutran Street, Saida, South
Baalbek 961 8 370200/ 961 8 370449 961 3 373986 Baalbek, Beqaa
Zahleh and Ferzol 961 8 820540/ 961 8 800333 961 3 746700 961 822406 Zahleh, Bekaa
Tyre 961 7 740015/ 961 7 740546/ 961 7 800119 Tyre, South

Armenian Catholic Church[edit | edit source]

Armenian Catholic Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address Email
Beirut 7 961 9 260552/ 961 9 262706/ 961 1 570555 961 3 885500 961 1 563894 Jeitawi, Ashrafieh, Beirut patrarca@magnarama.com
Armenian Catholic Convents
Convent City District (Caza) Landline
Mekhitarist Rawda Matn 961 1 269170
Mekhitarist Bikfaya Matn 961 4 981077
Our Lady of Bzoummar Bzoummar Kesrouane 961 9 262706
Mekhitarist Hazmieh Baabda 961 5 451115
Hripsimiantz Fanar Matn 961 1 891068

Syriac Catholic Church[edit | edit source]

Syriac Catholic Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Address
Beirut 6 961 1 616396/ 961 1 615892/ 961 1 616573 961 3 606567 Damscus Road, Museum, Beirut
Syriac Catholic Convents
Convent City District (Caza) Landline
El Sherfa Daroun Kesrouane 961 9 263040
St Ephraim monastery for the sisters Batha Kesrouane 961 9 263874

Chaldean Catholic Church[edit | edit source]

Chaldean Catholic Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address
Beirut 2 961 5 457732/ 961 5 457731/ 961 459088 961 3 885500 961 5 457731 Brasilia, Hazmieh, Beirut

Coptic Catholic Church[edit | edit source]

Coptic Catholic Parishes
City Parishes Landline Fax Address
See Maronite eparchy of Beirut 1 (Saint Antoune Le Grand/Jdeidet El Metn) 202 22571740 202 24545766 34 Ibn Sandar Street - Kobri El Kobbeh, P.O. Box 69 - Saray El Kobbeh, 11712 Le Caire, Egypte.

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Latin Catholic Church in Lebanon consists mainly of small group of Latin Catholics who are of at least partial French and/or Italian descent.

Among the Armenians in Lebanon there are some who belong to the Armenian Catholic Church. They are also refugees who had fled Turkey during and after World War I and the Armenian genocide.

The members of the Syriac Catholic Church are also refugees who had fled southeastern Turkey (present day Mardin region) during and after World War I and the Assyrian/Syriac genocide. Even today refugees continue to flee from northern Iraq and northeastern Syria into Lebanon or Jordan due to continuous unrest in Iraq and Syria. The Syriac Catholic Eparchy of Beirut is the proper archeparchy (Eastern Catholic (archdiocese) of the Syriac Catholic Church's (Antiochian Rite in Syriac language) Patriarch of Antioch in his actual seat, Beirut, Lebanon.

The members of the Chaldean Catholic Church are also refugees who had fled southeastern Turkey (present day Mardin region) during and after World War I and the Assyrian/Syriac genocide. Even today refugees continue to flee from northern Iraq and northeastern Syria into Lebanon or Jordan due to continuous unrest in Iraq and Syria. The Chaldean Catholic Eparchy of Beirut is the sole eparchy (Eastern Catholic diocese) of the Chaldean Catholic Church and is immediately dependent on the Chaldean Catholic Patriarch of Babylon in Baghdad, Iraq.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Records[edit | edit source]

Online Records[edit | edit source]

Online information is available to current members, for deceased members and immediate family members who are still living. Sign in to FamilySearch and then select Family Tree in the drop-down menu.

Maronite Catholic Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Below is the information for both Maronite parishes and convents.


Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Maronite Christians in Lebanon is the largest Christian denomination among the Lebanese people.

Maronite Church full communion with the Catholic Church was reaffirmed in 1182, after hundreds of years of isolation in Mount Lebanon. In accordance with the terms of union, they retain their own rites and canon law and use Arabic and Aramaic in their liturgy as well the Karshuni script with old Syriac letters.

In the late seventh century, as a result of persecutions from other Christians for the heterodox views they had adopted, the Maronites withdrew from the coastal regions into the mountainous areas of Lebanon and Syria. During the Ottoman era (1516-1914) they remained isolated and relatively independent in these areas. In 1857 and 1858 the Maronites revolted against the large landowning families. The revolt was followed by a further struggle between the Druzes and Maronites over land ownership, political power, and safe passage of community members in the territory of the other. The conflict led France to send a military expedition to the area in 1860. The disagreements diminished in intensity only after the establishment of the Mandate and a political formula whereby all denominations achieved a degree of political representation.

Leaders of the Rite have considered Maronite Christianity as the "foundation of the Lebanese nation". The Maronites have been closely associated with the political system of independent Lebanon; it was estimated that in pre-Civil War Lebanon members of this Rite held a large portion of the leading posts. However roles were shifted due to the Taif Agreement's theoretical balancing of power.

Eastern Orthodox Church Records [edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Greek Orthodox Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address
Dhour El Choueir (Patriarchate) 961 4 393583/ 961 4 390046 St Elias Convent, Shouwayya, Dhour El Choueir, Matn
Beirut and Dependencies 16 961 1 200611/ 961 1 217611 961 1 200611 Ashrafieh, Sursok Street, Beirut, P.O Box 186
Jbeil, Batroun and Mount-Lebanon 961 4 961209/ 961 4 961647/ 961 4864418 961 4961199 Brumana
Tripoli, Koura and dependencies 961 6 442264-5/ 961 6 601102 961 3 336254 961 6 442767 El Mina, Tripoli
Sour, Saida, Marjaayoun and dependencies 961 7 720811/ 961 7 740182/ 961 7 733889/ 961 7 890012 961 3 344099 Saida, South
Zahleh, Baalbek and dependecies 961 8 820528/ 961 8 826882 Zahleh
Aakkar and dependencies 961 6 690012/ 961 6 693196 961 3 228922 961 6 693194 Sheikh Tabba, Aakkar
Greek Orthodox Convents
Convent Village District (Caza) Landline Mobile
Saint Georges Deir El Harf Matn 961 5 380440 961 3 399719
Rikad El Sayde Kaftoun Koura 961 6 922856 961 725807
Saint John the Baptist Douma Batroun 961 6 780043 961 3 812559
Mar Selwan El Atoussi Douma Batroun 961 6 780043 961 3 812559
Saydet El Nourieh Hamat Batroun 961 3 721013
Rikad El Sayde Hamatoura Zgharta 961 6 510127 961 3 308127
Saydet El Natour Anfeh Koura 961 6 401250
El Chafia El Hara Bdeba Koura 961 6 651639 961 3 558784
Sayde Bkeftine Koura 961 3 489042
Saint Yaccoub El Farsi El Moukataa Dedde Koura 961 6 405176

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

Eastern Orthodox Christianity in Lebanon is the second largest Christian denomination among the Lebanese people.

The Eastern Orthodox Christians include many free-holders, and the community is less dominated by large landowners than other Christian denominations. In present-day Lebanon, the Eastern Orthodox Christians have become increasingly urbanized, and form a major part of the commercial and professional class of Beirut and other cities. Many are found in the Southeast (Nabatieh/Beqaa) and North, near Tripoli. They are highly educated and well-versed in finance. The church has often served as a bridge between Lebanese Christians and the Arab countries, because it exists in various parts of the Arab world.

Armenian Orthodox or Apostolic[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Armenian Orthodox Parishes
City Parishes Address
Antelias (Patriarchate) 961 4 4100001/ 961 4 410003/ 961 4 410550 /961 4 980060 Antelias, Matn
Beirut 961 1 980730 Mauris Paris Strret, St Nichan Church
961 1258300 Burj Hammoud, Arax Street, 40 Martyrs Church

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Armenians in Lebanon were refugees who had fled Turkey during and after World War I and the Armenian genocide.

The Apostolic Church was organized in the third century and became autocephalous as a national church in the fourth century. In the sixth century it modified the formulations of the Council of Chalcedon of 451 that confirmed the dual nature of Christ in one person. Instead the Apostolic Church adopted a form of Miaphysitism that believes in the united nature of divine and human in Christ, a belief shared by the Copts and the Syrian Orthodox Church (Oriental Orthodox Church). The Armenian Orthodox Church has two catholicoi (Sis and Etchmiadzin Cathedral) and two patriarchs (Constantinople and Jerusalem).

The Armenians in Lebanon reside mostly in Beirut and its northern suburbs as well as in Anjar. During the civil war the main stance of the Armenians was not to pick a side between Muslims or Christians and stay exempt mostly from the fighting. The largest Armenian community in Lebanon is found in Bourj Hammoud.

Assyrian Church of the East[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Assyrian Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address
Lebanon (Eparchy) 4 961 1 692692 961 3 619373 961 1 689587 Syriac quarter, Sid El Bauchrieh, Matn, P.O Box 90384

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Assyrians in Lebanon were refugees who had fled their native lands in southeastern Turkey during and after World War I due to the Assyrian Genocide. Even today refugees continue to flee from northern Iraq into Syria, Lebanon or Jordan due to continuous unrest in Iraq.

The Archdiocese of Lebanon and Syria of the Assyrian Church of the East is based in the Mar Gewargis Church of Sad El Bouchrieh, Beirut, Lebanon. After the recent passing of the archdiocese's late Archbishop Mar Narsai D'Baz, Archbishop Mar Meelis Zaia of Australia and New Zealand temporarily took over the archdiocese, handling all church related issues in Lebanon. The current bishops, the Bishop of Europe and the Bishop of Syria, oversee their individual dioceses until a new Metropolitan is appointed.

Syriac Orthodox Church[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Syriac Orthodox Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address
Beirut 3 961 1 317275 961 3 275360/ 961 3 375536 961 1 303373 Msaitbe
Zahleh and the Beqaa 2 961 8 820588/ 961 8 810851 Midan Street, Zahleh
Mount-Lebanon and Tripoli 5 961 1 690312/ 691 1 690313 961 3 780878 961 690314 Bauchrieh, Fardous Street, P.O Box 90420
Syriac Orthodox Convents
Convent City District (Caza) Landline
Mar Yaccoub El Baradii Bikfaya Matn 961 4 984446

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The members of the Syriac Orthodox Church are also refugees who had fled southeastern Turkey (present day Mardin region) during and after World War I and the Assyrian/Syriac genocide. Even today refugees continue to flee from northern Iraq and northeastern Syria into Lebanon or Jordan due to continuous unrest in Iraq and Syria.

There are several archdioceses and dioceses of the Syriac Orthodox Church on the territory of Lebanon.[31] The church follows the Syriac liturgy of St. James and has an independent hierarchy under the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch, whose seat was formerly at Mardin in Turkey and is now at Damascus, Syria.

Coptic Orthodox Church[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Coptic Orthodox Parishes
City Parishes Landline Mobile Fax Address
Beirut 961 1 485966 961 3 927303 961 1 485446 Jisr El Bacha, Mar Marcos parish, Matn, P.O.Box 55411

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Copts in Lebanon were immigrants/refugees who had fled their native lands in Egypt, Libya and Sudan. According to tradition, the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria was established by Saint Mark, an apostle and evangelist, in the middle of the 1st century (approximately AD 42). The ethnic Copts in Lebanon are estimated to be 3,000 – 4,000[20] and the Coptic Orthodox Church is one of the 18 religious sects recognized by the Lebanese Constitution.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia contributors, "Christianity in Lebanon", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity_in_Lebanon, accessed 12 April 2020.