Cumberland County, North Carolina Genealogy

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Guide to Cumberland County, North Carolina ancestry, genealogy and family history, birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

County Facts
County seat: Fayetteville
Organized: 19 February 1754
Parent County(s): Bladen[1]
Neighboring Counties
Bladen  • Harnett  • Hoke  • Moore  • Robeson  • Sampson
See County Maps
Courthouse
Cumberland County, North Carolina courthouse.jpg
Location Map
Nc-cumberland.png
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County Information[edit | edit source]

Description[edit | edit source]

Cumberland County is located in the South-Central portion of North Carolina and its name was derived from the title of Prince William Augustus, the Duke of Cumberland, the son of King George II[2].

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

Cumberland County Courthouse
117 Dick Street Room 114
Fayetteville, NC 28301-5725
Phone: 910-678-7775
Cumberland County Website

Register of Deeds has birth marriage, death and burial records
Clerk Superior Court has divorce records from 1930
probate records from 1850 rec from 1900[3]

PO Box 363
Fayetteville, NC 28302
Telephone: (910) 475-3000

Cumberland County, North Carolina Record Dates[edit | edit source]

Information for this chart was taken from various sources, often containing conflicting dates. This information should be taken as a guide and should be verified by contacting the county and/or the state government agency.

Known Beginning Dates for Major County Records[4]
Birth* Marriage Death* Court Land Probate Census
1913 1800 1913 1755 1752 1757 1784
Statewide registration for births and deaths started in 1913. General compliance by 1920.

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

There is no known history of courthouse disasters in this county.

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

  • 1754--Cumberland County was created 19 February 1754 from Bladen County.
  • County seat: Fayetteville[5]

For animated maps illustrating North Carolina county boundary changes, "Rotating Formation North Carolina County Boundary Maps" (1664-1965) may be viewed for free at the MapofUS.org website.

Populated Places[edit | edit source]

For a complete list of populated places, including small neighborhoods and suburbs, visit HomeTown Locator. The following are the most historically and genealogically relevant populated places in this county:[6]

Cities
Towns
Unincorporated communities
  • Pope AAF
Census-designated places
Townships
  • Cross Creek
  • Eastover
  • Gray's Creek
  • Manchester
  • Pearces Mill
  • Rockfish
  • Seventy-First


History Timeline[edit | edit source]

Resources[edit | edit source]

Bible Records[edit | edit source]

Biographies[edit | edit source]

- Family Historiesa list of holdings created by families using genealogical records and oral stories.

- People and Families: vertical file index by Cumberland County Public Library and Information Center

- African American lawmaker's from North Carolina are in this book: Freedom's Lawmakers: A Directory of Black Officeholders During Reconstruction

Business, Commerce, and Occupations[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries of Cumberland County, North Carolina online and in print
Tombstone Transcriptions Online
Tombstone Transcriptions in Print (Often more complete)
List of Cemeteries in the County
See North Carolina Cemeteries for more information

 

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 8,730
1800 9,264 6.1%
1810 9,382 1.3%
1820 14,446 54.0%
1830 14,834 2.7%
1840 15,284 3.0%
1850 20,610 34.8%
1860 16,369 −20.6%
1870 17,035 4.1%
1880 23,836 39.9%
1890 27,321 14.6%
1900 29,249 7.1%
1910 35,284 20.6%
1920 35,064 −0.6%
1930 45,219 29.0%
1940 59,320 31.2%
1950 96,006 61.8%
1960 148,418 54.6%
1970 212,042 42.9%
1980 247,160 16.6%
1990 274,566 11.1%
2000 302,963 10.3%
2010 319,431 5.4%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".


Church Records[edit | edit source]

Baptist

  • Cape Fear Constituted 1756.[7][8]
  • Neal's Creek Established by 1798.[7]
  • Stony Creek Constituted 1787.[9]

Catholic

  • St. Patrick Church, Fayetteville, N.C. Consecrated 1829.[10]

Church of England

  • St. David's Parish[11]

Presbyterian

  • Barbecue Church, near Olivia, N.C. Founded 1757.[12] Now located in Harnett.
  • MacPherson Church Established early 1800s.[13]
  • Old Bluff Church Organized 1758.[14]


List of Churches and Church Parishes

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Directories[edit | edit source]

Emigration and Immigration[edit | edit source]

Ethnic, Political, and Religious Groups[edit | edit source]

Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

  • Jarman German, John L. "Finding the Father of David German of North Carolina and Shelby County, Indiana," The American Genealogist, Vol. 68, No. 2 (Apr. 1993):87-94.
  • Lewis Lewis, J.D. My Neck of the Woods: The Lewis Families of Southeastern North Carolina and Northeastern South Carolina. Little River, S.C.: J.D. Lewis, 2002. FHL Book 929.273 L585Ljd; CD-ROM no. 1036

Guardianship[edit | edit source]

Land and Property Records[edit | edit source]

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

Moore CountyHarnett CountySampson CountyBladen CountyRobeson CountyHoke CountyNC CUMBERLAND.PNG
Click a neighboring county
for more resources

Migration[edit | edit source]

Military Records[edit | edit source]

Revolutionary War

Civil War

Regiments. Men in Cumberland County served in various regiments. Men often joined a company (within a regiment) that originated in their county. Listed below are companies that were specifically formed in Cumberland County:

-1st Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, usually known as the Bethel Regiment.
-3rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
-5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
-8th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
- 1st Regiment, North Carolina Infantry,usually known as the Bethel Regiment, Company F and Company H
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company A
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company B
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company C
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company D
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company E
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company F
- 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Local Defense Troops, Company G
- 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Company D
- 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company C
- 3rd Regiment, North Carolina State Troops, Company C
- 5th Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry (63rd Regiment Volunteers), Company A
- 5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company A
- 7th Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves, Company A
- 8th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Company E
- 8th Regiment, North Carolina Senior Reserves, Captain Neill McNeill's Company
- 8th Regiment, North Carolina Senior Reserves, Captain W J Kelly's Company

Civil War Battles
The following Civil War battle was fought in Cumberland County:

  • March 16, 1865 Averasborough, also known as Taylor’s Hole Creek, Smithville, Smiths Ferry, or Black River[15]
Map showing Civil War battles in North Carolina.

Freedmen's Records

Fayetteville - North Carolina, Freedmen's Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872

World War I

World War II

Naturalization and Citizenship[edit | edit source]

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

North Carolina Newspapers by DigitalNC

Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center:

- Fayetteville—18th Century

- Fayetteville Miscellaneous Newspapers—1806-1894

- Fayetteville North Carolina Journal—May 1826 Nov 1838

- Fayetteville North Carolina—May 1826 to April 1861 and 1864 (non-inclusive)

- Fayetteville North Carolina Presbyterian—Jan 1858 to Dec 1898

- Fayetteville News—Sept 1865 to Aug 1868

- Fayetteville Eagle—Aug 1868 to May 1875

- Fayetteville Messenger—Oct 1887 to Dec 1888

- Fayetteville North Carolina Gazette—Jan 1874 to Jan 1880

- Fayetteville Index—Feb 1909 to Dec 1917

- Cape Fear News—Nov 1915 to Mar 1917

- Fayetteville Observer: August 22, 1816 to March 6, 1865, The Fayetteville Observer Offices and presses were destroyed by fire in March of 1865, a

casualty of the Civil War, and did not resume until 1883, February 8, 1883 to present

- Fayetteville Times: July 1, 1973 to August 31, 1990 (the Times merged with the Observer at this time)

Obituaries[edit | edit source]

Other Records[edit | edit source]

County Records

Periodicals[edit | edit source]

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

Online Probate Records

Online Indexes

School Records[edit | edit source]

Yearbooks

Tax Records[edit | edit source]

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Birth[edit | edit source]

Marriage[edit | edit source]

Death[edit | edit source]

Divorce[edit | edit source]

Yearbooks[edit | edit source]

- Local Yearbook Collection Indexby Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center

Research Facilities[edit | edit source]

Archives[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance, free access to center-only databases, and to premium genealogical websites.
FamilySearch Affiliate Libraries have access to most center-only databases, but may not always have full services normally provided by a family history center.

Local Centers and Libraries

Libraries[edit | edit source]

Museums[edit | edit source]

Societies[edit | edit source]

  • Cumberland County Genealogical Society
    PO Box 53299
    Fayetteville, NC 28305
    website

Websites[edit | edit source]

  • NCGenWeb: Cumberland County genealogy resources; part of the USGenWeb Project
  • FamilySearch Catalog – The FamilySearch catalog contains descriptions and access information for all genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, and publications) in their collection.  Use Historical Records to search for specific individuals in genealogical records.

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  2. https://www.ncpedia.org/geography/cumberland
  3. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  4. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), Cumberland County, North Carolina. Page 506-514 At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002; Alice Eichholz, ed. Ancestry’s Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, Third ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 505-509.
  5. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  6. Wikipedia contributors, "Cumberland County, North Carolina," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland_County,_North_Carolina, accessed 12 February 2020.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Lemuel Burkitt and Jesse Read, A Concise History of the Kehukee Baptist Association: From Its Original Rise Down to 1808 (1808), Chapter 16. Digital version at archive.org.
  8. "Cape Fear Baptist Church," North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program, http://www.ncmarkers.com, accessed 22 October 2012.
  9. George Washington Paschal, History of North Carolina Baptists, 2 vols. (1930; reprint, Gallatin, Tenn.: Church History Research and Archives, 1990), 2:563. FHL Book 975.6 K2p 1990.
  10. "John England 1786-1842," North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program, http://www.ncmarkers.com/, accessed 22 October 2012.
  11. Donna Sherron, "North Carolina Parishes," accessed 12 October 2012. Digital version at Lost Souls Genealogy
  12. "Barbecue Church," North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program, http://www.ncmarkers.com, accessed 22 October 2012.
  13. "MacPherson Church," North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program, http://www.ncmarkers.com, accessed 22 October 2012.
  14. "Old Bluff Church," North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program, http://www.ncmarkers.com, accessed 22 October 2012.
  15. Heritage Preservation Services, Civil War Battle Summaries by State, (accessed 8 August, 2012)
  16. Genealogical Society of Utah, Parish and Vital Records List (July 1998). Microfiche. Digital version at https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/images/4/4d/Iginorthcarolinaa.pdf.